Reconnecting People

Blog

Occasional fits of obsessive analysis, bits of what I'm learning along the way, with a dash of self-promotion.

Design Thinking: Human-Centered Approaches to Making the World
 

As I've fallen deeper in love with human-centered design, I've discovered more opportunities to practice this delightfully creative problem-solving methodology. This summer, I'm assisting the amazing Liz Kramer in teaching design thinking at Washington University in St. Louis. We're coaching a group of 18 students through a full design cycle in a blistering 5 weeks. Not only have they grasped how to do human-centered design, but they've actually produced some incredible new ideas for the university's many alternative transportation programs. Because that's what happens in design. That's why I love it.

So I'm delighted to announce that I'll be teaching U44 Bus 290, Design Thinking: Human-Centered Approaches to Making the World, at the university this Fall. Here's the course description:

This course introduces design thinking: a process of identifying, creating, and implementing solutions. Students learn methods and work in teams to apply these methods to a locally relevant problem. Methodologies drawn from anthropology, business, design, and engineering enable students to discover users’ needs; synthesize complex information; identify directives for design; generate ideas; and prototype, test, and communicate solutions. Additionally, students explore the role of design thinking in business, education, and social change through readings, case studies, lectures, guest speakers, discussion, and written exercises. No previous experience in design is required.

Registration is open. I hope to see you in class.

Update (August 17, 2015): Want to see the syllabus? You're welcome.

 
On an immersive research sortie into the alternative transportation experience for this summer's course, I faced the challenge of repairing my road bike while riding the Metro.

On an immersive research sortie into the alternative transportation experience for this summer's course, I faced the challenge of repairing my road bike while riding the Metro.

Nobody said design thinking was easy. Getting this wire out of my gears sure wasn't.

Nobody said design thinking was easy. Getting this wire out of my gears sure wasn't.